Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992)

Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder and Anthony Hopkins star in director Francis Ford Coppola's visually stunning, passionately seductive version of the classic Dracula legend. In BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA, Coppola returns to the original source of the Dracula myth, and from that gothic romance, he creates a modern masterpiece. Gary Oldman's metamorphosis as Dracula who grows from old to young, from man to beast is nothing short of amazing. Winona Ryder brings equal intensity to the role of a young beauty who becomes the object of Dracula's devastating desire. Anthony Hopkins co-stars as the famed doctor who dares to believe in Dracula, and then dares to confront him. Opulent, dazzling and utterly irresistible, this is Dracula as you've never seen him. And once you've seen BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA, you'll never forget it.

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Doctor Zhivago is a 1965 British-Italian epic romantic drama film directed by David Lean. It is set in Russia between the years prior to World War I and the Russian Civil War of 1917–1922, and is based on the Boris Pasternak novel of the same name. While immensely popular in the West, the book was banned in the Soviet Union for decades. For this reason, the film could not be made in the Soviet Union and was instead filmed mostly in Spain. The film stars Omar Sharif in the title role as Yuri Zhivago and Julie Christie as his love interest Lara Antipova. The supporting cast includes Geraldine Chaplin, Rod Steiger, Alec Guinness, Tom Courtenay, Ralph Richardson, Siobhán McKenna and Rita Tushingham. Contemporary critics were generally disappointed, complaining of its length at over three hours, and claiming that it trivialized history, but acknowledging the intensity of the romantic drama and the treatment of human themes. Over time, however, the film's reputation has improved greatly. At the 38th Academy Awards, Doctor Zhivago won five Oscars: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, Best Cinematography (Color), Best Art Direction (Color) and Best Costume Design (Color); it was nominated for five others (including Best Picture), but lost four of these five to The Sound of Music. It also won five awards at the 23rd Golden Globe Awards. As of 2016, it is the eighth highest-grossing film of all time in the United States and Canada, adjusted for ticket-price inflation. It was ranked by the American Film Institute in 1998 as the 39th greatest film on their 100 Years..100 Movies list, and by the British Film Institute the following year as the 27th greatest British film of all time.

The Social Network (2010)

The Social Network is a 2010 American drama film directed by David Fincher and written by Aaron Sorkin. Adapted from Ben Mezrich's 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook, A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius, and Betrayal, the film portrays the founding of social networking website Facebook and the resulting lawsuits. It stars Jesse Eisenberg as founder Mark Zuckerberg, along with Andrew Garfield as Eduardo Saverin and Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker, the other principals involved in the website's creation. Armie Hammer, Max Minghella, Josh Pence, Brenda Song, and Rashida Jones also star. Neither Zuckerberg nor any other Facebook staff were involved with the project, although Saverin was a consultant for Mezrich's book. The film was released in the United States by Columbia Pictures on October 1, 2010. The Social Network received widespread acclaim, with critics praising its direction, screenplay, acting, editing and score. Although several people portrayed in the film criticized its historical inaccuracies, the film appeared on 78 critics' Top 10 lists for 2010; of those critics, 22 had the film in their number-one spot, the most of any film in its year. Rolling Stone's Peter Travers said "The Social Network is the movie of the year. But Fincher and Sorkin triumph by taking it further. Lacing their scathing wit with an aching sadness, they define the dark irony of the past decade." It was also Roger Ebert's selection for the best film of the year. At the 83rd Academy Awards, the film received eight nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director for Fincher, and Best Actor for Eisenberg, and won three for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, and Best Film Editing. The film also received awards for Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Original Score at the 68th Golden Globe Awards.

Better Off Dead... (1985)

Better Off Dead is a 1985 American teen romantic comedy film starring John Cusack and written and directed by Savage Steve Holland. It tells the story of high school student Lane Myer who is suicidal after his girlfriend breaks up with him shortly before Christmas.

Best In Show (2000)

At the prestigious Mayflower Dog Show, a "documentary film crew" captures the excitement and tension displayed by the eccentric participants in the outrageously hilarious satire Best in Show. This biting send-up exposes the wondrously diverse dog owners who travel from all over America to showcase their four-legged contenders. Mild-mannered salesman Gerry Fleck (Eugene Levy) and his vivacious wife, Cookie (Catherine O'Hara), happily prepare their Norwich Terrier, while shop owner Harlan Pepper (Christopher Guest) hopes his Bloodhound wins top prize. As two upwardly mobile attorneys (Parker Posey and Michael Hitchcock) anxiously ready their neurotic Weimaraner and an ecstatically happy gay couple (Michael McKean and John Michael Higgins) dote on their tiny Shih Tzu, inept commentator Buck Laughlin (Fred Willard) vainly attempts to provide colorful tidbits about each breed. Now, with the championship at stake, the owners and the canine competitors strut their stuff for the judges in hopes of taking home the ultimate prize...Best in Show.

Before Sunset (2004)

Before Sunset is a 2004 American romantic drama film, the sequel to Before Sunrise (1995). Like its predecessor, the film was directed by Richard Linklater. He shares screenplay credit with actors Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, and with Kim Krizan, the screenwriter for the first film featuring these two characters. The film picks up the story in Before Sunrise of the young American man (Hawke) and French woman (Delpy) who spent a passionate night together in Vienna. Their paths intersect nine years later in Paris, and the film appears to take place in real time as they spend an afternoon together. Before Sunset received broad critical acclaim with a 95% Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. The directors and lead actors collaborated on another film following these characters, Before Midnight, which was released in 2013 and also gained acclaim.

Bolero (1984)

It's high camp from the desert to Spain as Bo Derek roars throughout the '20s and sheds the trappings of girlhood. Her erotic odyssey takes her from the sand of the bullring and into the bed of the world's greatest matador, where she finds love and lust and plays it all for laughs.

Better Than Chocolate (1999)

Better Than Chocolate is a 1999 Canadian romantic comedy movie shot in Vancouver directed by Anne Wheeler.

Red (2010)

Red is a 2010 American action comedy film inspired by the limited comic book series of the same name created by Warren Ellis and Cully Hamner and published by the DC Comics imprint Homage. The film stars Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker, Helen Mirren and Karl Urban, with German film director Robert Schwentke directing a screenplay by Jon Hoeber and Erich Hoeber. In the film version, the title is derived from the designation of former CIA Agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis), meaning "Retired, Extremely Dangerous". The film was released on October 15, 2010. The film grossed $199 million worldwide. In 2011, the film received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Musical or Comedy Film. A sequel, Red 2, was released on July 19, 2013. Another sequel, Red 3, is in development.

Battle of Britain (1969)

Battle of Britain is a 1969 British Second World War film directed by Guy Hamilton, and produced by Harry Saltzman and S. Benjamin Fisz. The film broadly relates the events of the Battle of Britain. The script by James Kennaway and Wilfred Greatorex was based on the book The Narrow Margin by Derek Wood and Derek Dempster. The film endeavoured to be an accurate account of the Battle of Britain, when in the summer and autumn of 1940 the British RAF inflicted a strategic defeat on the Luftwaffe and so ensured the cancellation of Operation Sea Lion – Adolf Hitler's plan to invade Britain. The film is notable for its spectacular flying sequences, in contrast with the unsatisfactory model work seen in Angels One Five (1952) and on a far grander scale than had been seen on film before; these made the film's production very expensive.

Blindness (2008)

Blindness is a 2008 Brazilian-Canadian film, an adaptation of the 1995 novel of the same name by Portuguese author José Saramago about a society suffering an epidemic of blindness. The film was written by Don McKellar and directed by Fernando Meirelles with Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo as the main characters. Saramago originally refused to sell the rights for a film adaptation, but the producers were able to acquire it with the condition that the film would be set in an unnamed and unrecognizable city. Blindness premiered as the opening film at the Cannes Film Festival on May 14, 2008, and the film was released in the United States on October 3, 2008.

Big Red (1962)

Big Red is a 1962 American family-oriented adventure film from Walt Disney Productions. Based on a 1945 novel by American author Jim Kjelgaard and adapted to the screen by American screenwriter Louis Pelletier, the film starred Walter Pidgeon. Filmed in the province of Quebec, "Big Red" is an Irish Setter that would rather run through the woods than be the perfectly trained and groomed show dog his sportsman owner (Pidgeon) wants. A ten-year-old orphan boy (Payant) helps look after the dog and rebels against his owner's strict discipline of "Big Red."

The Searchers (1956)

The Searchers is a 1956 American Technicolor VistaVision Western film directed by John Ford, based on the 1954 novel by Alan Le May, set during the Texas–Indian Wars, and starring John Wayne as a middle-aged Civil War veteran who spends years looking for his abducted niece (Natalie Wood), accompanied by his adoptive nephew (Jeffrey Hunter). Critic Roger Ebert found Wayne's character, Ethan Edwards, "one of the most compelling characters Ford and Wayne ever created". The film was a commercial success, although it received no Academy Award nominations. Since its release, it has come to be considered a masterpiece, and one of the greatest and most influential films ever made. It was named the greatest American western by the American Film Institute in 2008, and it placed 12th on the same organization's 2007 list of the 100 greatest American movies of all time. Entertainment Weekly also named it the best western. The British Film Institute's Sight & Sound magazine ranked it as the seventh best film of all time based on a 2012 international survey of film critics and in 2008, the French magazine Cahiers du Cinéma ranked The Searchers number 10 in their list of the 100 best films ever made. In 1989, The Searchers was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress, and selected for preservation in its National Film Registry; it was in the first cohort of films selected for the registry.

The Big Short (2015)

When four outsiders see what the big banks, media and government regulators refuse to - the impending collapse of the global economy - they have an idea: The Big Short. Their bold investment leads them into the dark underbelly of the modern banking industry where they must question everyone and everything.

District 13: Ultimatum (2009)

District 13: Ultimatum, also known as D13-U (French title Banlieue 13 – Ultimatum or B13-U), is a 2009 sequel to the 2004 French parkour-filled action film District 13. The film, directed by Patrick Alessandrin and written and produced by Luc Besson (who also wrote and produced the first film), sees parkour artists David Belle and Cyril Raffaelli reprising their original roles of Leïto and Damien.

Bugsy Malone (1976)

Bugsy Malone is a 1976 American-British musical gangster comedy film, directed by Alan Parker and featuring only child actors. Set in New York City, the film is loosely based on events in New York and Chicago from the early 1920s to 1931 during Prohibition, specifically the exploits of real-life gangsters like Al Capone and Bugs Moran, as dramatized in cinema. Parker lightened the subject matter considerably for the children's market; in the U.S. the film received a G rating. The film was Parker's feature-length directorial debut, introduced actor Scott Baio, and featured a 13-year old Jodie Foster.

The Beastmaster (1982)

The Beastmaster is a 1982 sword and sorcery film directed by Don Coscarelli and starring Marc Singer, Tanya Roberts, John Amos and Rip Torn. The film is about a child who is stolen from his mother's womb by a witch. The child grows into Dar, who has the ability to communicate telepathically with animals. Dar grows up in a village where he learns to do battle. But the village is destroyed by a race of beast-like warriors under the control of the sorcerer Maax. Dar vows revenge and travels with new friends to stop Maax from causing any more problems. The Beastmaster was not a great box office success in the United States but later received extensive television exposure on cable in the United States on channels TBS and HBO. The film had two sequels and a syndicated television series that chronicled the further adventures of Dar.

Babe: Pig In The City (1998)

Babe: Pig in the City is a 1998 Australian-American comedy-drama film and the sequel to the 1995 film Babe. It is co-written, produced and directed by George Miller, who co-wrote and produced the original film. Most of the actors from the first film reappeared as their respective roles, including James Cromwell, Miriam Margolyes, Hugo Weaving, Danny Mann, and Magda Szubanski. However, most of them have only brief appearances, as the story focuses on the journey of Babe and the farmer's wife Esme in the fictional city of Metropolis. The film was nominated for Best Original Song at the 1998 Academy Awards. In more recent years, Babe: Pig in the City has gained a cult fanbase.

Beavis and Butt-Head Do America (1996)

Beavis and Butt-Head Do America is a 1996 American adult animated road comedy film based on the MTV animated television series Beavis and Butt-Head. Co-written and directed by series creator Mike Judge, the film stars the regular television cast of Judge with guest performances by Demi Moore, Bruce Willis, Robert Stack and Cloris Leachman. The film centers on Beavis and Butt-Head as they travel across the country in search of their stolen television set.

Iron Man & Hulk: Heroes United (2013)

Marvel makes cinematic history again with the most unexpected team-up in the universe! Joining forces for the first time ever, Hulk’s pulverizing brute strength and Tony Stark’s high-tech brainpower come together to face off against the ultimate enemy. When “Zzzax,” a seemingly invincible, energy-devouring monster, threatens to destroy the planet, Marvel’s unlikeliest pairing of Avengers is mankind’s only hope. Alone, neither can defeat the awesome power of Zzzax. As a duo, they just might have a chance – if they can find a way to work together without smashing heads before time runs out! Packed with explosive action, loaded with exclusive bonus features and presented in groundbreaking Marvel CG Animation, Marvel’s Iron Man & Hulk: Heroes United is a must-own movie event that will blow you away!

Black Belt Jones (1974)

Black Belt Jones is a 1974 American blaxploitation martial arts film directed by Robert Clouse and starring Jim Kelly. The main musical theme was performed by funk guitarist Dennis Coffey.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical drama film based on the life of John Nash, a Nobel Laureate in Economics. The film was directed by Ron Howard, from a screenplay written by Akiva Goldsman. It was inspired by a bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1998 book of the same name by Sylvia Nasar. The film stars Russell Crowe, along with Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bettany, Adam Goldberg, Judd Hirsch, Josh Lucas, Anthony Rapp, and Christopher Plummer in supporting roles. The story begins in Nash's days as a graduate student at Princeton University. Early in the film, Nash begins to develop paranoid schizophrenia and endures delusional episodes while painfully watching the loss and burden his condition brings on wife Alicia and friends. The film opened in the United States cinemas on December 21, 2001. It went on to gross over $313 million worldwide and won four Academy Awards, for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress. It was also nominated for Best Actor, Best Film Editing, Best Makeup, and Best Original Score. It was well received by critics, but has been criticized for its inaccurate portrayal of some aspects of Nash's life, especially his other family and a son born out of wedlock. However, the filmmakers have stated that the film was not meant to be a literal representation.

The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas (1982)

The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is a 1982 American musical comedy film co-written, produced and directed by Colin Higgins (in his final film as director). It is an adaptation of the 1978 Broadway musical of the same name, and stars Dolly Parton, Burt Reynolds, Jim Nabors, Charles Durning, Dom DeLuise, Noah Beery, Jr., Robert Mandan, Lois Nettleton, Theresa Merritt, Barry Corbin, Mary Jo Catlett and Mary Louise Wilson. Durning was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as the Texas governor. Golden Globe nominations went to the film for Best Motion Picture (Comedy or Musical) and Parton for Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Comedy or Musical). It was the fourth highest-grossing live-action musical film of the 1980s.

Blue Caprice (2013)

Blue Caprice is a 2013 American independent drama film directed by Alexandre Moors. It recounts the story of an abandoned boy who is lured to America and drawn into the shadow of a dangerous father figure in this film inspired by the real life events that led to the 2002 Beltway sniper attacks. The film investigates the genesis of those horrific events from the point of view of the two shooters, whose distorted father-son relationship facilitated their long and bloody journey across the United States. The film stars Isaiah Washington, Tequan Richmond, Joey Lauren Adams, Tim Blake Nelson and Leo Fitzpatrick. Blue Caprice debuted at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. The film was released in theaters on Sept 13, 2013. The film is titled "The Washington Snipers" in some regions.

The Big Blue (1988)

The Big Blue (released in some countries under the French title Le Grand Bleu) is a 1988 English-language film in the French Cinéma du look visual style, made by French director Luc Besson. The film is a heavily fictionalized and dramatized story of the friendship and sporting rivalry between two leading contemporary champion free divers in the 20th century: Jacques Mayol (played by Jean-Marc Barr) and Enzo Maiorca (renamed to "Enzo Molinari" and played by Jean Reno), and Mayol's fictionalized relationship with his girlfriend Johana Baker (played by Rosanna Arquette). The film, which covers their childhood in 1960s Greece to their deaths in a 1980s Sicilian diving competition, is a cult-classic in the diving fraternity, and became one of France's most commercially successful films (although an adaptation for US release was a commercial failure in that country). President of France, Jacques Chirac, referred to the film in describing Mayol, after his death in 2001, as having been an enduring symbol for the "Big Blue" generation. The story was heavily adapted for cinema — in real life Mayol lived from 1927 to 2001 and Maiorca retired from diving to politics in the 1980s. Both set no-limits category deep diving records below 100 metres, and Mayol was indeed involved in scientific research into human aquatic potential, but neither reached 400 feet (122 metres) as portrayed in the film, and they were not direct competitors. Mayol himself was a screenwriter for the film, and Mayol's search for love, family, "wholeness" and the meaning of life and death, and the conflict and tension between his yearning for the deep, and his relationship with his girlfriend, also form part of the backdrop for the latter part of the film.

Bowfinger (1999)

Bowfinger is a 1999 American satirical comedy film directed by Frank Oz. It depicts a down-and-out filmmaker in Hollywood attempting to make a film on a small budget with a star who does not know that he is in the film. It was written by Steve Martin, to portray himself, Eddie Murphy in two roles, and Heather Graham as a vapid, ambitious starlet.

The Big Red One (1980)

The Big Red One is a World War II war film starring Lee Marvin and Mark Hamill, released in 1980. It was written and directed by Samuel Fuller. It was heavily cut on its original release, but a restored version, The Big Red One: The Reconstruction, was premièred at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival, seven years after Fuller's death. Fuller wrote a book, with the same title, which was more a companion novel than a novelization of the film, although it features many of the scenes that were originally cut.

Because I Said So (2007)

Academy Award®-winning actress Diane Keaton stars with Mandy Moore, Lauren Graham and Piper Perabo in this heartwarming comedy about mothers, daughters and cutting the apron strings. When it comes to her three, free-spirited daughters, Daphne (Keaton) is just your normal overprotective, overbearing, over-the-top mother. Worried that her youngest daughter, Millie (Moore), will end up alone, Daphne meddles in her daughter's love life until she ends up doing all the wrong things for all the right reasons... and all in the name of motherly love.

Baby Boom (1987)

Baby Boom is a 1987 romantic comedy film directed by Charles Shyer, written by Nancy Meyers and Shyer, and produced by Meyers and Bruce A. Block for United Artists. It stars Diane Keaton as a yuppie who discovers that a long-lost cousin has died, leaving her a six-month-old baby girl as inheritance. The film received generally favorable reviews and was a modest box-office success during its original run, eventually grossing $26,712,476. The film launched a subsequent television show, running from 1988 to 1989, and was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards.

Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest (2011)

A Tribe Called Quest has been one of the most commercial successful and artistically significant musical groups in recent history. The band’s sudden break-up in 1998 shocked the industry and saddened the scores of fans, whose appetite for the group’s innovative musical stylings never seem to diminish. This insightful film, directed by Michael Rapaport, takes viewers on a behind-the-scenes journey - chronicling the group's rise to fame and revealing the stories behind the tensions which erupted in the years to come.

The King's Speech (2010)

The King's Speech is a 2010 British biographical drama film directed by Tom Hooper and written by David Seidler. Colin Firth plays the future King George VI who, to cope with a stammer, sees Lionel Logue, an Australian speech and language therapist played by Geoffrey Rush. The men become friends as they work together, and after his brother abdicates the throne, the new king relies on Logue to help him make his first wartime radio broadcast on Britain's declaration of war on Germany in 1939. Seidler read about George VI's life after overcoming a stuttering condition he endured during his youth. He started writing about the relationship between the therapist and his royal patient as early as the 1980s, but at the request of the King's widow, Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, postponed work until her death in 2002. He later rewrote his screenplay for the stage to focus on the essential relationship between the two protagonists. Nine weeks before filming began, Logue's notebooks were discovered and quotations from them were incorporated into the script. Principal photography took place in London and around Britain from November 2009 to January 2010. The opening scenes were filmed at Elland Road, Leeds, and Odsal Stadium, Bradford, both locations standing in for the old Wembley Stadium. For indoor scenes, Lancaster House substituted for Buckingham Palace, and Ely Cathedral stood in for Westminster Abbey, while the weaving mill scene was filmed at the Queen Street Mill in Burnley. The cinematography differs from that of other historical dramas: hard light was used to give the story a greater resonance and wider than normal lenses were employed to recreate the Duke of York's feelings of constriction. A third technique Hooper employed was the off-centre framing of characters: in his first consultation with Logue, the Duke is captured hunched on the side of a couch at the edge of the frame. Released in the United Kingdom on 7 January 2011, The King's Speech was a major box office and critical success. Censors initially gave it adult ratings due to profanity, though these were later revised downwards after criticism by the makers and distributors in the UK and some instances of swearing were muted in the US. On a budget of £8 million, it earned over £250 million internationally ($400 million). It was widely praised by film critics for its visual style, art direction, and acting. Other commentators discussed the film's representation of historical detail, especially the reversal of Winston Churchill's opposition to abdication. The film received many awards and nominations, particularly for Colin Firth's performance; his Golden Globe Award for Best Actor was the sole win at that ceremony from seven nominations. The King's Speech won seven British Academy Film Awards, including Best Film, Best Actor (Firth), Best Supporting Actor (Rush), and Best Supporting Actress (Helena Bonham Carter). The film also won four Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director (Hooper), Best Actor (Firth), and Best Original Screenplay (Seidler).

The Notorious Bettie Page (2006)

The Notorious Bettie Page is a 2005 biographical film directed by Mary Harron. The screenplay by Harron and Guinevere Turner focuses on 1950s pinup and bondage model Bettie Page.

The Birds (1963)

Wealthy reformed party girl Melanie Daniels enjoys a brief flirtation with lawyer Mitch Brenner in a San Francisco pet shop and decides to follow him to his Bodega Bay home. Bearing a gift of two lovebirds, Melanie quickly strikes up a romance with Mitch while contending with his possessive mother and boarding at his ex-girlfriend's house. One day, during a birthday party for Mitch's younger sister, a flock of birds attacks the children in what seems to be a random incident. In fact, it signals the beginning of a massive and organised avian assault on the residents of the town - a mysterious spate of violence that no one can explain... and from which no one might come out alive.

Buck And The Preacher (1972)

Widely regarded at the time of its release as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid with a social conscience, BUCK AND THE PREACHER is an immensely satisfying Western which marked Sidney Poitier's directorial debut, as well as his first screen pairing with superstar Harry Belafonte. Poitier stars as Buck, an ex-Union Army Cavalry sergeant who becomes a scout for freed slaves heading to the Colorado frontier. Tagging along with him are his wife (Ruby Dee in a scene-stealing performance) and a Bible-thumping con artist known as the Preacher (Belafonte). Attacked by racist bounty hunters determined to return the former slaves to a life of sharecropping in Louisiana, Buck and his followers must summon all the courage they have in order to reach their destination and help settle the Wild West.

Bounce (2000)

Bounce is a 2000 American romantic drama film starring Ben Affleck and Gwyneth Paltrow and directed by Don Roos.

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason (2004)

The sequel to "Bridget Jones's Diary" finds Bridget (Renée Zellweger) working as a TV host and still dating barrister Mark (Colin Firth). But Bridget is jealous of the time Mark spends with a co-worker (Jacinda Barrett), and, despite a vacation meant to smooth things over, ends their relationship. On assignment in Thailand, she has a dalliance with her disreputable ex, Daniel (Hugh Grant), and is temporarily jailed on the false accusation of drug smuggling, before Mark comes to the rescue.

Big Bad Mama (1974)

Big Bad Mama is a 1974 American film produced by Roger Corman, starring Angie Dickinson, William Shatner, and Tom Skerritt, with Susan Sennett and Robbie Lee. This film is about a mother, Wilma (played by Angie Dickinson), and her daughters, Polly (Robbie Lee) and Billie Jean (Susan Sennett), who go on a crime spree. After the mother un-expectantly falls in love with a bank robber it all ends with tragic consequences. Big Bad Mama was followed by a sequel, Big Bad Mama II, in 1987.

Beyond The Sea (2004)

Academy Award® winner Kevin Spacey (AMERICAN BEAUTY) directs and stars in this gripping biopic of one of America’s greatest performers, Bobby Darin. Working his way from shady nightclubs to his dream destination, The Copacabana, Darin lived a rags-to-riches life. He was a marvel at singing, songwriting, and performing such hits as “Splish Splash,” “Mack the Knife” and more, stealing the hearts of fans everywhere – despite the suffering of his own heart.

The Bride Wore Red (1937)

Bankrolled by a count with a taste for practical jokes, streetwise bargirl Anni (Joan Crawford) passes herself off as an aristocrat at a posh Alpine resort. There she plans to land a wealthy husband (Robert Young) pronto, even though she’s drawn to the town postman (Franchot Tone, Crawford’s then-husband, in the last of the seven films they made together). From its love-vs-security theme to its knockout clothes (the eponymous dress boasts two-million bugle beads), The Bride Wore Red is a quintessential woman’s picture—and it features a fabulous woman on each side of the camera: gorgeous Crawford, at her romantic, rags-to-riches peak and Dorothy Arzner (Dance, Girl, Dance), Hollywood’s only Golden Age female director.

Notorious (2009)

Notorious is a 2009 American biographical drama film about the life and murder of Christopher Wallace, an American rapper better known by the stage name The Notorious B.I.G. The film was directed by George Tillman Jr. and starring Jamal Woolard, Angela Bassett, Derek Luke and Anthony Mackie, was released by Fox Searchlight Pictures in North America on January 16, 2009.

Unhung Hero (2013)

UnHung Hero (also known as Unhung Hero) is a 2013 documentary directed by Brian Spitz and starring Patrick Moote.

Bambi (1942)

Bambi is a 1942 American animated film directed by David Hand, produced by Walt Disney and based on the book Bambi, a Life in the Woods by Austrian author Felix Salten. The film was released by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942, and is the fifth Disney animated feature film.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014)

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), commonly known simply as Birdman, is a 2014 American satirical black comedy-drama film directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu. It was written by Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo. The film stars Michael Keaton with a supporting cast of Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Andrea Riseborough, Amy Ryan, Emma Stone, and Naomi Watts. The story follows Riggan Thomson (Keaton), a faded Hollywood actor best known for playing the superhero "Birdman", as he struggles to mount a Broadway adaptation of a short story by Raymond Carver. The film covers the period of previews leading to the play's opening, and with a brief exception appears as if filmed in a single shot, an idea Iñárritu had from the film's conception. Emmanuel Lubezki, who won the Academy Award for his cinematography in Birdman, believed that the recording time necessary for the unique long take approach taken in Birdman could not have been made with older technology. The film was shot in New York City during the spring of 2013 with a budget of $16.5 million jointly financed by Fox Searchlight Pictures, New Regency Pictures and Worldview Entertainment. It premiered the following year in August where it opened the 71st Venice International Film Festival. Birdman had a limited theatrical release in the United States on October 17, 2014, followed by a wide release on November 14, grossing more than $103 million worldwide. The film won the Academy Award for Best Picture, along with Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Cinematography from a total of nine nominations, tying it with The Grand Budapest Hotel for the most nominated and awarded film at the Academy's 87th annual awards ceremony with four wins per film. It also won Outstanding Cast in a Motion Picture at the 21st Screen Actors Guild Awards, as well as Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy for Keaton and Best Screenplay at the 72nd Golden Globe Awards.

Band of the Hand (1986)

Welcome to the jungle, Miami-style, where fast cars, dirty deals, hot women, and acid-washed jeans all come with the turf. Producer Michael Mann (Ali, The Insider) delivers an action-packed dose of high-octane fun in this infamous 1980s crime thriller, BAND OF THE HAND. Directed by Paul Michael Glaser (TV's "Starsky & Hutch"), the cast features awesome performances by future stars Laurence Fishburne (The Matrix), Lauren Holly (What Women Want), Leon (Above the Rim), James Remar (TV's "Sex & the City"), and James Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig & the Angry Inch). The killer retro soundtrack features the title track performed by Bob Dylan backed by Tom Petty's Heartbreakers. While serving time in a grueling rehab program in Florida's Everglades, five young felons bond together to form an unlikely union. When they return to Miami's dangerous ghetto, the five former criminals wage a lethal war on the drug kingpins who rule the underworld of murder and mayhem. BAND OF THE HAND goes for the jugular, never once loosening its grip until its heart-stopping climax!

Billy Jack (1971)

Billy Jack is a 1971 action/drama independent film; the second of four films centering on a character of the same name which began with the movie The Born Losers (1968), played by Tom Laughlin, who directed and co-wrote the script. Filming began in Prescott, Arizona, in the fall of 1969, but the movie was not completed until 1971. American International Pictures pulled out, halting filming. 20th Century-Fox came forward and filming eventually resumed but when that studio refused to distribute the film, Warner Bros. stepped forward. Still, the film lacked distribution, so Laughlin booked it into theaters himself in 1971. The film died at the box office in its initial run, but eventually took in more than $40 million in its re-release, with distribution supervised by Laughlin.

Bless The Child (2000)

Bless the Child is a 2000 American horror-thriller film directed by Chuck Russell, starring Kim Basinger, Jimmy Smits, Angela Bettis, Rufus Sewell, Christina Ricci, and Holliston Coleman. It is based on the novel of the same name by Cathy Cash Spellman.

Bad Blood (2015)

After receiving a bone-marrow transplant, a man commits murder and implicates his donor (Taylor Cole).

Buster and Billie (1974)

Buster and Billie (1974) is an American motion picture released by Columbia Pictures. The film was of the tragic romance/revenge film genres. It was directed by Daniel Petrie, whose credits include films such as Fort Apache, The Bronx (1981). In the title roles were future Airwolf star Jan-Michael Vincent as Buster, and Joan Goodfellow as Billie. In supporting roles, Buster and Billie also featured Pamela Sue Martin of Dynasty fame as Buster's girlfriend Margie, and Robert Englund, who later shot to fame in the Nightmare on Elm Street film series as Freddy Kreuger, in a small role as Buster's friend, Whitey. This film is also notable as one of the earliest American mainstream movies to have male frontal nudity. Much of the movie was filmed in Metter, GA, Register, GA and surrounding areas. Townspeople were excited the movie was being filmed and were unaware of the movie's risque plot or nudity.

Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970)

Beneath the Planet of the Apes is a 1970 American science fiction film directed by Ted Post and written by Paul Dehn. It is the second of five films in the original Planet of the Apes series produced by Arthur P. Jacobs. The film stars James Franciscus, Kim Hunter, Maurice Evans, and Linda Harrison, and features Charlton Heston in a supporting role. In this sequel, another spacecraft crashes on the planet ruled by apes, carrying astronaut Brent who searches for Taylor and discovers an underground city inhabited by mutated humans with psychic powers. Beneath the Planet of the Apes was a success at the box office but met with mixed reviews from critics. It was followed by Escape from the Planet of the Apes.

Biutiful (2010)

Biutiful is a 2010 Mexican-Spanish drama film directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu and starring Javier Bardem. It is González Iñárritu's first feature since Babel and fourth overall, and his first film in his native Spanish language since his debut feature Amores perros. The title Biutiful refers to the phonological spelling in Spanish of the English word beautiful. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards in 2011: Best Foreign Language Film and Best Actor for Javier Bardem. Bardem's nomination makes his performance the first entirely Spanish-language performance to be nominated for that award. Bardem also received the Best Actor Award at Cannes for his work on the film.

Buena Vista Social Club (1999)

Traveling from the streets of Havana to the stage of Carnegie Hall, this revelatory documentary captures a forgotten generation of Cuba’s brightest musical talents as they enjoy an unexpected encounter with world fame. The veteran vocalists and instru­mentalists collaborated with American guitarist and roots-music champion Ry Cooder to form the Buena Vista Social Club, playing a jazz-inflected mix of cha-cha, mambo, bolero, and other traditional Latin American styles, and recording an album that won a Grammy and made them an international phenomenon. In the wake of this success, director Wim Wenders filmed the ensemble’s members—including golden-voiced Ibrahim Ferrer and piano virtuoso Rubén González—in a series of illuminating interviews and live performances. The result is one of the most beloved documentaries of the 1990s, and an infectious ode to a neglected corner of Cuba’s prerevolutionary heritage.

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)

Two Western bank/train robbers flee to Bolivia when the law gets too close.

The Bedroom Window (1987)

Terry is having an affair with his boss' wife Sylvia. One night after an office party they are together and Sylvia witnesses an attack on Denise from Terry's bedroom window. She doesn't want to expose their relationship and so is reluctant about talking to the police. Terry, wanting to help, gives the police the description of the attacker. However, he soon becomes the main suspect in the case.

Red Tails (2012)

A breathtaking tribute to the unsung heroes who rose above extraordinary challenges and ultimately soared into history. Italy, 1944: As the war takes its toll on Allied forces in Europe, a squadron of black pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen are finally given the chance to prove themselves in the sky…even as they battle discrimination on the ground.

Reds (1981)

Reds is a 1981 American epic drama film co-written, produced and directed by Warren Beatty. The picture centers on the life and career of John Reed, the journalist and writer who chronicled the Russian Revolution in his book Ten Days That Shook the World. Beatty stars in the lead role alongside Diane Keaton as Louise Bryant and Jack Nicholson as Eugene O'Neill. The supporting cast of the film includes Edward Herrmann, Jerzy Kosinski, Paul Sorvino, Maureen Stapleton, Gene Hackman, Ramon Bieri, Nicolas Coster and M. Emmet Walsh. The film also features, as "witnesses," interviews with the 98-year-old radical educator and peace activist Scott Nearing (1883–1983), author Dorothy Frooks (1896–1997), reporter and author George Seldes (1890–1995), civil liberties advocate Roger Baldwin (1884–1981), and the American writer Henry Miller (1891–1980), among others. Beatty was awarded the Academy Award for Best Director and the film was nominated for Best Picture, but lost to Chariots of Fire. Beatty, Keaton, Nicholson and Stapleton were nominated for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress, respectively, the last time a film was nominated in all four acting categories until Silver Linings Playbook in 2012. Stapleton was the only one of the four to win, with Beatty and Keaton losing to Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn for On Golden Pond and Nicholson to John Gielgud for Arthur. Beatty was also nominated, along with co-writer Trevor Griffiths, for Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, but lost to Chariots of Fire. Beatty became the third person to be nominated for Academy Awards in the categories Best Actor, Director and Original Screenplay for a film nominated for Best Picture. This was done previously by Orson Welles for Citizen Kane and Woody Allen for Annie Hall. In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed its "Ten Top Ten" – the best ten films in ten "classic" American film genres – after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community. Reds was acknowledged as the ninth best film in the epic genre.

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972)

Dracula A.D. 1972 is a 1972 horror film, directed by Alan Gibson and produced by Hammer Film Productions. It was written by Don Houghton and stars Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Stephanie Beacham. Unlike earlier films in Hammer's Dracula series, Dracula A.D. 1972 has (at the time of filming) a contemporary setting, in an attempt to update the Dracula story for modern audiences. Dracula is brought back to life in modern London and preys on a group of young party-goers, that includes the descendant of his nemesis, Van Helsing. It is the seventh Hammer film featuring Dracula, and the sixth to star Christopher Lee in the title role. It also sees the return of Peter Cushing as Van Helsing for the first time since The Brides of Dracula in 1960, and is the first to feature both Lee and Cushing in their respective roles since 1958's Dracula. It was followed by the last film in Hammer's Dracula series to star Christopher Lee, The Satanic Rites of Dracula, which similarly has a modern setting and features most of the same central characters.

Mystic River (2003)

Mystic River is a 2003 American mystery drama film directed and scored by Clint Eastwood. It stars Sean Penn, Tim Robbins, Kevin Bacon, Laurence Fishburne, Marcia Gay Harden, and Laura Linney. The screenplay by Brian Helgeland was based on the novel of the same name by Dennis Lehane. The film was produced by Robert Lorenz, Judie G. Hoyt and Eastwood. It is the first film on which Eastwood was credited as composer of the score. The film opened to widespread critical acclaim. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Supporting Actor. Sean Penn won Best Actor and Tim Robbins won Best Supporting Actor, making Mystic River the first film to win both awards since Ben-Hur in 1959.

Brand: A Second Coming (2015)

Brand: A Second Coming, also called BRAND: The Film, is a 2015 British documentary film about comedian Russell Brand directed by Ondi Timoner. The film documents Brand's transformation from a comedian to activist over the past five years. It debuted at the 2015 South by Southwest festival in March, but elicited some controversy as Brand declined to attend the premiere and is reportedly unhappy with the film.

Batman & Robin (1997)

Superstars George Clooney and Arnold Schwarzenegger face off as the coolest--and the cruelest--villain to ever stalk Gotham City comes after its courageous caped crusaders, Batman & Robin. When the evil Mr. Freeze (Schwarzenegger) teams up with toxic Poison Ivy (Uma Thurman) to freeze Gotham City and destroy its residents, the end appears near for superheroes Batman (George Clooney) and Robin (Chris O'Donnell). But with the arrival of Batgirl (Alicia Silverstone), the dynamic duo becomes a transcendent trio in this fourth episode of the blockbuster theatrical series.  

Beyond The Law (1992)

Beyond the Law is a 1992 TV film written and directed by Larry Ferguson. It tells the story of Dan Saxon, an undercover cop who infiltrates a group of criminal outlaw bikers behind a drug-smuggling and arms-dealing operation. In order to maintain their trust, he must commit ever more dangerous and heinous crimes and must question how far he can go beyond the law. The film stars Charlie Sheen, Linda Fiorentino, and Michael Madsen.

Bucky Larson: Born To Be A Star (2011)

Bucky [Nick Swarsdon] is a small town grocery bagger who heads out to LA to pursue his dreams of becoming a porn star. Also starring Christina Ricci, Don Johnson and Stephen Dorff.

Being There (1979)

Being There is a 1979 American comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby. Its screenplay was adapted by Jerzy Kosiński and the uncredited Robert C. Jones from the 1970 novel by Kosiński. The film stars Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Richard A. Dysart, Jack Warden, and Richard Basehart. Douglas won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and Sellers was nominated for Best Actor. The screenplay won the British Academy Film Award for Best Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium. It was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay. The making of the film is portrayed in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers, a biographical film of Sellers' life. In 2015 the United States Library of Congress selected Being There for preservation in the National Film Registry, finding it "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Body Shots (1999)

Body Shots is a 1999 American comedy drama film written by David McKenna and directed by Michael Cristofer. It stars Sean Patrick Flanery, Jerry O'Connell, Amanda Peet, Tara Reid and Ron Livingston. It tells the story of eight singles whose night of drunken debauchery goes terribly wrong.

Bowling for Columbine (2002)

Bowling for Columbine is a 2002 American documentary film written, produced, directed, and narrated by Michael Moore. The film explores what Moore suggests are the primary causes for the Columbine High School massacre in 1999 and other acts of violence with guns. Moore focuses on the background and environment in which the massacre took place and some common public opinions and assumptions about related issues. The film also looks into the nature of violence in the United States. A critical and commercial success, the film brought Moore international attention as a rising filmmaker and won numerous awards, including the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, the Independent Spirit Award for Best Documentary Feature, a special 55th Anniversary Prize at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, and the César Award for Best Foreign Film. It is now considered one of the greatest documentaries of all time.

Battlefield America (2012)

Battlefield America is an American dance-drama film by Cinedigm. It was directed by Chris Stokes from You Got Served. The film stars Gary Anthony Sturgis, Tristen M. Carter, Marques Houston, Kida Burns, Zach Balandres, Camren Bicondova, Edward Mandell, and Kyle Brooks. It was released on June 1, 2012 in American theaters.

Blindside (2012)

Following her parent's separation, Becky's life changes for the worse when her mother, Amanda is blindsided by a charming stranger, who is not quite what he seems. One fateful night will forever change their destiny.

Before I Go To Sleep (2014)

Before I Go to Sleep is a 2014 British-American mystery psychological thriller written and directed by Rowan Joffé. A film adaptation of S. J. Watson's 2011 novel of the same name, the film stars Nicole Kidman, Mark Strong, Colin Firth, and Anne-Marie Duff.

Bel Ami (2012)

Bel Ami is a 2012 drama film starring Robert Pattinson, Uma Thurman, Kristin Scott Thomas, Christina Ricci and Colm Meaney. The film is directed by Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod and is based on the 1885 French novel of the same name by Guy de Maupassant. The film had its world premiere out of competition at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival on 17 February 2012, and was released theatrically on 8 June 2012 by Magnolia Pictures. The film was budgeted at €9 million.

Bending The Rules (2012)

Bending the Rules is a 2012 action comedy film directed by Artie Mandelberg, produced by WWE Studios, and starring Adam "Edge" Copeland and Jamie Kennedy. The film was released on March 9, 2012 in select theaters in the United States for a limited time.

Boys and Girls (2000)

A friendship is put to the ultimate test when two best friends wind up in bed together.

Babes in Toyland (1961)

Babes in Toyland is a 1961 American Technicolor Christmas musical film directed by Jack Donohue and distributed to theatres by Buena Vista Distribution. It stars Ray Bolger as Barnaby, Annette Funicello as Mary Contrary, Tommy Sands as Tom Piper, and Ed Wynn as the Toymaker. The film is based upon Victor Herbert's popular 1903 operetta Babes in Toyland. There had been a 1934 film also titled Babes in Toyland starring Laurel and Hardy, and three television adaptations prior to the Disney film, but Disney's was only the second film version of the operetta released to movie theatres and the first in Technicolor. The plot, and in some cases the music, bear little resemblance to the original, as Disney had most of the lyrics rewritten and some of the song tempos drastically changed, including the memorable song "Toyland", a slow ballad, which was speeded up with only the chorus sung in a march like rhythm. The toy soldiers would later appear in Christmas parades at the Disney theme parks around the world.

Blood And Chocolate (2007)

Blood & Chocolate is a 2007 fantasy-horror film directed by Katja von Garnier. Written by Ehren Kruger and Christopher Landon, their screenplay is very loosely based on Annette Curtis Klause's 1997 young adult novel of the same name. An international co-production between the United States, Germany, Romania, and the United Kingdom, Blood & Chocolate was both a commercial and critical failure.

Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas (1997)

Celebrate the most magical time of the year with this irresistible holiday movie, inspired by Disney's beloved classic. Share the wonder as Mrs. Potts recounts another "tale as old as time" about a Christmas past that almost wasn't, thanks to the scheming of former court composer Forte, who is determined to keep Belle and Beast apart forever. This enchanting adventure boasts delightful songs, spellbinding visuals and enduring themes of hope, friendship and love.

Big Jake (1971)

Big Jake is a 1971 Western film directed by George Sherman, written by Harry Julian Fink and Rita M. Fink, produced by Michael Wayne, edited by Harry Gerstad, starring John Wayne, Richard Boone and Maureen O'Hara, narrated by George Fenneman, and shot on location in Durango, Mexico.The supporting cast features Patrick Wayne, Christopher Mitchum, Glenn Corbett, Jim Davis, John Agar, Harry Carey, Jr., Ethan Wayne and Hank Worden. Big Jake was released to generally favorable critical reviews but to a lukewarm box office performance. It was the final film for Sherman in a directing career of more than 30 years.

Best of Enemies: Buckley vs. Vidal (2015)

Best of Enemies is a 2015 American documentary film co-directed by Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville about the 1968 televised debates between intellectuals Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley, Jr., and their aftermath. The film premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. It was acquired by Magnolia and Participant Media. The film took five years to make because of struggles to secure funding, get interviews, and uncover archival footage.

Bambi and the Great Prince of the Forest (2006)

Bambi II is a 2006 American animated drama film directed by Brian Pimental and produced by the Australian office of DisneyToon Studios, animation production by DisneyToon Studios Sydney, Australia and Toon City Animation, Inc., Manila, Philippines, that initially premiered in theaters in Argentina on January 26, 2006, before being released as a direct-to-video title in the United States on February 7, 2006. It is a followup to the 1942 film Bambi.

A Better Life (2011)

A Better Life is a 2011 American drama film directed by Chris Weitz. The screenplay, originally known as The Gardener, was written by Eric Eason based on a story by Roger L. Simon. Demián Bichir was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Bastard Out Of Carolina (1996)

Bastard out of Carolina is a 1996 film made by Showtime Networks, directed by Anjelica Huston. It is based on a novel by Dorothy Allison and adapted for the screen by Anne Meredith. Jena Malone stars as a poor, physically abused and sexually molested girl. In 1997 the theatrical and video releases of the film were banned by Canada's Maritime Film Classification Board. The video was eventually granted release upon appeal. The film won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries or a Special (Linda Lowy) and was nominated for Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries or a Special (Anjelica Huston), Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special (Glenne Headly), and Outstanding Made for Television Movie (Amanda DiGiulio, Gary Hoffman). It was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival.

Boys (1996)

Boys is a 1996 American film starring Winona Ryder and Lukas Haas. The film was originally titled The Girl You Want. The film earned $516,350 in the United States box office. It is based on a short story called "Twenty Minutes" by James Salter. The film is set in an East Coast boys boarding school, and was shot in Baltimore and on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland.

Bol Bachchan (2012)

When Abbas breaks open the lock of an ancestral Hindu temple to save a child trapped inside, he faces trouble. He tries to hide his true identity with a fake Hindu name, which leads to a web of lies.

Battle Force (2012)

In 1942 an elite fighting unit was formed, officially named the First Special Service Force. They were made up of mountain men, hunters and all-around misfits, and were trained to scale cliffs, jump out of airplanes, and kill Nazis. The following summer, days before the invasion of Sicily, the best of these men were handpicked for a desperate mission. Amidst the bloodshed of World War II, these men went armed for combat, and the only way out was to aim, fire and stay alive.

Born To Be Wild (2011)

Born to Be Wild is a 2011 American nature documentary short film about orphaned orangutans and elephants. It was directed by David Lickley, written and produced by Drew Fellman. It was distributed in the United States by Warner Bros. Pictures and IMAX Pictures. The film was released April 8, 2011, and is narrated by Morgan Freeman. There was a Premiere of the film in Montreal, Quebec on March 30, 2011, at 9:30 AM at the Montreal Science Centre IMAX Telus Theatre for Two Montreal Primary schools and two secondary schools.

Big Pun: The Legacy (2009)

Big Pun: The Legacy is a biographical documentary of the life of rapper Big Pun.

Brick (2006)

A teenage loner pushes his way into the underworld of a high school crime ring to investigate the disappearance of his ex-girlfriend.

Buddy (1997)

Buddy is a 1997 New Zealand/American film written and directed by Caroline Thompson and produced by Columbia Pictures with help from Jim Henson Pictures. It starred Rene Russo as Mrs. Gertrude 'Trudy' Lintz and Robbie Coltrane as her husband. The film was based on the life of a gorilla called Massa with elements of Gertrude Lintz's other gorilla Gargantua (who was called "Buddy" at the time). In real life, Massa became the oldest gorilla on record until 2008, while Buddy/Gargantua died young as a circus attraction and his remains are now on display in a museum. The gorilla suit used for Buddy was created by Jim Henson's Creature Shop.

Bingo (1991)

UNLEASH THE LAUGHS with this outrageous, over-the-edge comedy! When Bingo, a runaway circus dog who escapes the Big Top, saves the life of Chuckie, a young boy who's having trouble fitting in with his pals, the two quickly become best friends skateboarding, playing pinball and doing math homework together. But Chuckie's parents (Cindy Williams and David Rasche) discover the stowaway pooch, and make no bones about the fact that Bingo will not accompany them on their cross-country move. What follows is a heartwarming 1,000-mile adventure of puppy love and loyalty as Bingo and Chuckie encounter nutty characters and hilarious situations in their quest to be reunited. Dog catchers, kidnappers, hospitals, even prison, can't keep the two lovable misfits apart!

The Butcher (2006)

The Butcher is a 2006 horror film directed by Edward Gorsuch. It centers on a group of teenagers who discover a murderer living in the middle of nowhere after crashing their car.

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

The Bridge on the River Kwai is a 1957 British-American epic war film directed by David Lean and starring William Holden, Jack Hawkins, Alec Guinness, and Sessue Hayakawa. Based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwai (1952) by Pierre Boulle, the film is a work of fiction, but borrows the construction of the Burma Railway in 1942–1943 for its historical setting. The movie was filmed in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). The bridge in the film was near Kitulgala. Carl Foreman was the initial screenwriter, but Lean replaced him with Michael Wilson. Both writers had to work in secret, as they were on the Hollywood blacklist and had fled to England in order to continue working. As a result, Boulle (who did not speak English) was credited and received the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay; many years later, Foreman and Wilson posthumously received the Academy Award. The film was widely praised, winning seven Academy Awards (including Best Picture) at the 30th Academy Awards. In 1997, the film was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the United States Library of Congress. It is widely considered to be one of the greatest films in history.

Red 2 (2013)

In RED 2, the high-octane action-comedy sequel to the worldwide sleeper hit, retired black-ops CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a missing, next-generation lethal device that can change the balance of world power. To succeed, they'll need to survive an army of relentless assassins, ruthless terrorists, and power-crazed government officials, all eager to get their hands on the superweapon.

Red Eye (2005)

Red Eye is a 2005 American mystery thriller film directed by Wes Craven and written by Carl Ellsworth based on a story by Ellsworth and Dan Foos. The film follows a hotel manager ensnared in an assassination plot by a terrorist while aboard a red-eye flight to Miami. The film score was composed and conducted by Marco Beltrami, a frequent collaborator with Craven, who had previously scored the Scream film series. It was distributed by DreamWorks Pictures and was released on August 19, 2005. The film received positive reviews from critics and fans of Craven's work and was a box office success.

The Red Shoes (1948)

The Red Shoes, the singular fantasia from Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, is cinema’s quintessential backstage drama, as well as one of the most glorious Technicolor feasts ever concocted for the screen. Moira Shearer is a rising star ballerina torn between an idealistic composer and a ruthless impresario intent on perfection. Featuring outstanding performances, blazingly beautiful cinematography by Jack Cardiff, Oscar-winning sets and music, and an unforgettable, hallucinatory central dance sequence, this beloved classic, now dazzlingly restored, stands as an enthralling tribute to the life of the artist. The Red Shoes was restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive in association with the BFI, The Film Foundation, ITV Global Entertainment Ltd., and Janus Films. Restoration funding provided by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, The Film Foundation, and the Louis B. Mayer Foundation.

Red State (2011)

Three teenaged boys are lured to the town of Cooper’s Dell with the promise of a party. But instead of enjoying the night of their dreams, the teens are plunged into the nightmarish world of Pastor Abin Cooper and the Five Points Trinity, a fundamentalist group with a stockpile of weaponry and a deadly moral agenda. When word of the teens’ disappearance reaches the authorities, a military task force is mobiliz ed. With Cooper’s Dell teetering between salvation and damnation, the ATF braces for a furious gun battle with Cooper and his heavily armed followers in this fever-pitched action thriller from writer-director Kevin Smith.

Deep Red (1975)

Deep Red (original title Profondo Rosso; also known as The Hatchet Murders) is a 1975 Italian giallo film, directed by Dario Argento and co-written by Argento and Bernardino Zapponi. It was released on 7 March 1975. It was produced by Claudio and Salvatore Argento, and the film's score was composed and performed by Goblin. It stars Macha Meril as a medium and David Hemmings as a man who investigates a series of murders performed by a mysterious figure wearing black leather gloves. Argento later opened a retail movie memorabilia store in Rome called Profondo Rosso, operated for years by his long-time associate Luigi Cozzi. The film was a commercial success internationally and met with critical acclaim.

Red Lights (2012)

Red Lights is a 2012 Spanish-American thriller film written and directed by Rodrigo Cortés and starring Cillian Murphy, Sigourney Weaver, Robert De Niro, Toby Jones, Elizabeth Olsen, Joely Richardson and Leonardo Sbaraglia. The plot focuses on a physicist (Murphy) and a university psychology professor (Weaver), both of whom specialise in debunking supernatural phenomena, and their attempt at discrediting a renowned psychic (De Niro) whose greatest critic mysteriously died 30 years prior. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2012, and received a limited release in the United States on 13 July 2012.

Dear Dracula (2012)

A young horror fan decides to write a letter to his favorite vampire on Halloween.

Dracula: The Dark Prince (2013)

Dracula: The Dark Prince is a 2013 American fantasy horror film directed by Pearry Reginald Teo and written by Nicole Jones-Dion and Steven Paul. The film stars Luke Roberts, Jon Voight, Kelly Wenham and Ben Robson. The film was shot in Romania and released on 15 October 2013.

Dracula (2009)

Dracula begins a reign of terror in Hollywood, and Van Helsing seeks revenge.

The Perfect Candidate (2012)

This double shot of short comedies by Dave Campfield pays homage to cult movie icons. First making it's world premiere exclusively on Amazon Instant Video, The Perfect Candidate stars B movie legends Joe Estevez (Soultaker) and Robert Z'Dar (Maniac Cop) as they try to ascend to the nation's highest office as running mates. Then Troma CEO and cult film icon Lloyd Kaufman (The Toxic Avenger) stars as Judge Stoker Browning, presiding over the case of the wrongful death of Steven A. Dracula (Ed Dennehy), the lesser known brother of the infamous count. Featuring cameos scream queen Debbie Rochon and Madman star Paul Ehlers.

Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 American crime drama film directed by Sidney Lumet, written by Frank Pierson and produced by Martin Bregman and Martin Elfand. The film stars Al Pacino, John Cazale, Charles Durning, Chris Sarandon, Penelope Allen, James Broderick, Lance Henriksen and Carol Kane. The title refers to the sultry "dog days" of summer. The film was inspired by P. F. Kluge's article "The Boys in the Bank", which tells a story of a similar robbery of a Brooklyn bank by John Wojtowicz and Salvatore Naturale on August 22, 1972. This article was published in Life in 1972. The film received critical acclaim upon its September 1975 release by Warner Bros., some of which referred to its anti-establishment tone. Dog Day Afternoon was nominated for several Academy Awards and Golden Globe awards, and won one Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. In 2009, the film was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Almost Heroes (1998)

Almost Heroes is a 1998 adventure comedy film directed by Christopher Guest, narrated by Guest's friend and frequent collaborator Harry Shearer, and starring Chris Farley and Matthew Perry. This was Farley's last leading film role and was released following his death in 1997.